Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/17357
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Type: Journal article
Title: Neuropsychological and psychosocial function in children with a history of snoring or behavioral sleep problems
Author: Blunden, S.
Lushington, K.
Lorenzen, B.
Martin, A.
Kennedy, J.
Citation: Journal of Pediatrics, 2005; 146(6):780-786
Publisher: Mosby Inc
Issue Date: 2005
ISSN: 0022-3476
1097-6833
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Sarah Blunden; Kurt Lushington; Bernie Lorenzen; James Martin and Declan Kennedy
Abstract: Objectives: To compare neuropsychological and psychosocial function in children with a history of snoring, children with a history of behavioral sleep problems (BSP), children with both a history of snoring and BSP, and a group of control subjects. Study design: Families awaiting consultation for “sick” visits in 5 general practice clinics completed the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children. A subset of children were categorized into groups: Snorers (n = 11), BSP (n = 13), Snorers+BSP (n = 9), and controls (n = 31). Children underwent psychological (Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, Children's Memory Scale; Test of Everyday Attention and Auditory Continuous Performance Test) and psychosocial assessment (Child Behavior Checklist). Results: With analysis of variance, it was revealed that, compared with children in the BSP and control groups, those in the Snorers+BSP and Snorers groups showed reduced intelligence and attention scores. By contrast, compared with children in the Snorers and control groups, children in the Snorers+BSP and BSP groups reported reduced social competency, increased problematic behavior, and reduced memory scores. Children in the combination of Snorers+BSP group showed more deficits than children in all other groups. Conclusion: In children, snoring and BSP, separately and together, are associated with impaired neuropsychological and psychosocial functioning. Furthermore, snoring and BSP are related to performance in disparate ways. Snoring was associated with intelligence and attention deficits, whereas BSP was associated with memory and behavioral deficits.
Keywords: Humans; Memory Disorders; Snoring; Analysis of Variance; Regression Analysis; Case-Control Studies; Impulsive Behavior; Social Behavior; Intelligence; Attention; Child Behavior Disorders; Neuropsychological Tests; Adolescent; Child; Female; Male; Surveys and Questionnaires; Sleep Wake Disorders
RMID: 0020050567
DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2005.01.043
Appears in Collections:Paediatrics publications

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