Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/23280
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Type: Journal article
Title: Inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis using rhodamine B in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA
Author: Derrick Roberts, A.
Thomas, B.
Wilkinson, A.
Fletcher, J.
Byers, S.
Citation: Pediatric Research, 2006; 60(3):309-314
Publisher: Int Pediatric Research Foundation Inc
Issue Date: 2006
ISSN: 0031-3998
1530-0447
Abstract: Reduction of an enzyme activity required for the lysosomal degradation of glycosaminoglycan (gag) chains will result in a mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) disorder. Substrate deprivation therapy (SDT), a potential therapy option for MPS with residual enzyme activity, aims to reduce the synthesis of gag chains, the natural substrate for the deficient enzyme. Reduced substrate levels would balance the reduced level of enzyme in patient cells, resulting in normalized gag turnover. Rhodamine B, a nonspecific inhibitor, reduced gag synthesis in a range of normal and MPS cells and also decreased lysosomal storage of gag in MPS VI (72%) and MPS IIIA (60%) cells. Body weight gain of male MPS IIIA mice treated with 1 mg/kg rhodamine B was reduced compared with untreated MPS IIIA mice and was indistinguishable from that of normal mice. Liver size, total gag content, and lysosomal gag was reduced in treated MPS IIIA animals as was urinary gag excretion. Lysosomal gag content in the brain was also reduced by treatment. The alteration in MPS IIIA clinical pathology by rhodamine B, combined with the observation that treatment had no effect on the health of normal animals, demonstrates the potential for SDT in general as a therapy for MPS disorders.
Keywords: Liver
Brain
Cells, Cultured
Animals
Mice
Mucopolysaccharidosis III
Disease Models, Animal
Weight Gain
Rhodamines
Glycosaminoglycans
Organ Size
Male
DOI: 10.1203/01.pdr.0000233037.00707.da
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 6
Paediatrics publications

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