Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/23502
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHill, C.en
dc.contributor.authorGill, T.en
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, A.en
dc.contributor.authorDaly, A.en
dc.contributor.authorDalGrande, E.en
dc.contributor.authorAdams, R.en
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.citationClinical Rheumatology, 2007; 26(7):1049-1054en
dc.identifier.issn0770-3198en
dc.identifier.issn1434-9949en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/23502-
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies using clinic or convenience samples have indicated that not only patients with arthritis are at increased risk of depression, but there may also be a link between depression and disability in people with arthritis. We examined the prevalence of psychological distress in a population sample with and without arthritis and the association with health-related quality of life. The WANTS Health and Well-being Survey was a population household telephone interview survey of adults (age ≥18 years) in three states of Australia. Data obtained were weighted to provide population-representative estimates. The survey included questions regarding arthritis, SF-12, the Kessler 10 index of psychological distress and presence of mental health conditions. A total of 7,473 interviews providing information on arthritis were completed, with 1,364 (18.3%) reporting arthritis. Self-reported mental health conditions were more frequent in those with arthritis (14.9 vs 12.0%, p = 0.004), and a higher proportion were at a medium or high risk for anxiety or depression (39.0 vs 31.0%, p < 0.001). People with arthritis had significantly lower scores on the SF-12 physical component summaries compared to those without arthritis. Among those with arthritis, those with coexisting psychological distress had significantly lower scores on the SF-12 physical component summary than those without psychological distress. Psychological distress is common among people with arthritis in the community. In arthritis, psychological distress makes a significant additional negative impact on the physical well-being. Physicians need to recognize and address this additional impact on physical functioning in patients with arthritis.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityCatherine L. Hill, Tiffany Gill, Anne W. Taylor, Alison Daly, Eleonora Dal Grande and Robert J. Adamsen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlagen
dc.subjectArthritis; population-based study; psychological distressen
dc.titlePsychological factors and quality of life in arthritis: a population-based studyen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0020061455en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10067-006-0439-3en
dc.identifier.pubid52267-
pubs.library.collectionMedicine publicationsen
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.identifier.orcidHill, C. [0000-0001-8289-4922]en
dc.identifier.orcidGill, T. [0000-0002-2822-2436]en
dc.identifier.orcidTaylor, A. [0000-0002-4422-7974]en
dc.identifier.orcidDalGrande, E. [0000-0002-5919-3893]en
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.