Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/27320
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Type: Journal article
Title: Mechanisms of attenuation of metal availability in in situ remediation treatments
Author: Hamon, R.
McLaughlin, M.
Cozens, G.
Citation: Environmental Science & Technology, 2002; 36(18):3991-3996
Publisher: Amer Chemical Soc
Issue Date: 2002
ISSN: 0013-936X
1520-5851
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Hamon, R. E.; McLaughlin, M. J.; Cozens, G.
Abstract: One suite of in situ technologies for remediating metal contaminated soils involves the addition of reactive materials which lower metal availability. Until now it has been difficult to assess whether the amendment induced decrease in metal availability is due simply to increased sorption of the metal or whether it is the result of surface precipitation or other fixation mechanisms. This has made it difficult to predict the long-term stability of such remedial treatments. Using an isotopic dilution technique coupled with a stepwise acidification treatment, we examined changes in the labile pool of Cd and Zn in a polluted soil amended with either CaCO3, KH2PO4, redmud, or a kaolin byproduct. Fixation of both Cd and Zn was greatest in the KH2PO4 treated soil. The mode of fixation in this treatment was also found to be resistant to soil acidification. The results allowed a clear distinction between three classes of attenuation mechanisms which are hypothesized to increase in their resilience to environmental change as follows: reversible absorptionirreversible "fixation" at constant pH < irreversible "fixation" across a range of pH.
Keywords: Humans; Phosphates; Metals, Heavy; Cadmium; Zinc; Potassium Compounds; Soil Pollutants; Chromatography, Ion Exchange; Adsorption; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Description: Copyright © 2002 American Chemical Society
RMID: 0020022118
DOI: 10.1021/es025558g
Appears in Collections:Soil and Land Systems publications
Environment Institute publications

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