Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/3076
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: A high-whey-protein diet reduces body weight gain and alters insulin sensitivity relative to red meat in Wistar rats
Author: Belobrajdic, D.
McIntosh, G.
Owens, J.
Citation: Journal of Nutrition, 2004; 134(6):1454-1458
Publisher: Amer Inst Nutrition
Issue Date: 2004
ISSN: 0022-3166
1541-6100
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Damien P. Belobrajdic, Graeme H. McIntosh, and Julie A. Owens
Abstract: A high-protein diet can reduce body weight and increase insulin sensitivity, but whether the type of dietary protein affects these outcomes is unknown. We hypothesized that feeding insulin-resistant rats a high-protein diet (32%) containing whey protein concentrate (WPC) would reduce body weight and tissue lipid levels and increase insulin sensitivity more than a diet containing red meat (RM). Rats were fed a high-fat diet (300 g fat/kg diet) for 9 wk, then switched to a diet containing either 80 or 320 g protein/kg diet, provided by either WPC or RM, for 6 wk (n = 8). The rats were then killed after overnight food deprivation. High dietary protein reduced energy intake (P < 0.001) and visceral (P < 0.001), subcutaneous (P < 0.001), and carcass fat (P < 0.05). Increasing the dietary density of WPC, but not of RM, reduced body weight gain by 4% (P < 0.001). Dietary WPC also reduced plasma insulin concentration by 40% (P < 0.05) and increased insulin sensitivity, compared to RM (P < 0.05). These findings support the conclusions that a high-protein diet reduces energy intake and adiposity and that whey protein is more effective than red meat in reducing body weight gain and increasing insulin sensitivity.
Keywords: Whey protein; red meat; protein density; weight gain; insulin sensitivity
Description: © 2004 The American Society for Nutritional Sciences
RMID: 0020040547
DOI: 10.1093/jn/134.6.1454
Published version: http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/abstract/134/6/1454
Appears in Collections:Molecular and Biomedical Science publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.