Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/32812
Type: Journal article
Title: Men and osteoporosis
Author: Diamond, T.
Sambrook, P.
Williamson, M.
Flicker, L.
Nowson, C.
Fiatarone-Singh, M.
Lord, S.
Ferris, L.
O'Neill, S.
MacLennan, A.
Citation: Australian Family Physician, 2001; 30(8):781-785
Publisher: Royal Australian College of General Practitioners
Issue Date: 2001
ISSN: 0300-8495
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Diamond T; Sambrook P; Williamson M; Flicker L; Nowson C; Fiatarone-Singh M; Lord S; Ferris L; O'Neill S; MacLennan A
Abstract: Background: While strict criteria have been developed for defining osteoporosis in women (bone mineral density measurements more than 2.5 standard deviations below the mean for young adult normal women, ie. t-score value <-2.5), there still remains a controversy regarding the definition in men. Spinal fractures occur in 5% and hip fractures in 6% of men older than 50 years. There are significant differences between men and women with respect to the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, underlying medical conditions and postfracture sequelae. Objective: To provide an overview of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and prevention of osteoporosis in men. Discussion: Osteoporosis is increasingly recognised. Data from the Dubbo Osteoporosis Epidemiology Study suggests that 30% of men in Australia aged over 60 years will suffer from an osteoporotic fracture. It is estimated that 30–60% of men presenting with spinal fractures will have another illness contributing to their bone loss. Osteoporotic fractures in men are associated with higher morbidity and mortality than in women. Lifestyle changes together with daily calcium supplementation should be implemented and vitamin D3 should be considered in men with osteopenia
Keywords: Humans; Osteoporosis; Calcium, Dietary; Cholecalciferol; Risk Factors; Bone Density; Middle Aged; Male
RMID: 0020012242
Appears in Collections:Obstetrics and Gynaecology publications

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