Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/35576
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Type: Journal article
Title: Recollection and familiarity in recognition memory: Evidence from ROC curves
Author: Heathcote, A.
Raymond, F.
Dunn, J.
Citation: Journal of Memory and Language, 2006; 55(4):495-514
Publisher: Academic Press Inc
Issue Date: 2006
ISSN: 0749-596X
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Andrew Heathcote, Frances Raymond, John Dunn
Abstract: Does recognition memory rely on discrete recollection, continuous evidence, or both? Is continuous evidence sensitive to only the recency and duration of study (familiarity), or is it also sensitive to details of the study episode? Dual process theories assume recognition is based on recollection and familiarity, with only recollection providing knowledge about study details. Single process theories assume a single continuous evidence dimension that can provide information about familiarity and details. We replicated list (Yonelinas, 1994) and plural (Rotello, Macmillan, & Van Tassel, 2000) discrimination experiments requiring knowledge of details to discriminate targets from similar non-targets. We also ran modified versions of these experiments aiming to increase recollection by removing non-targets that could be discriminated by familiarity alone. Single process models provided the best trade-off between goodness-of-fit and model complexity and dual process models were able to account for the data only when they incorporated continuous evidence sensitive to details.
Keywords: Recognition memory
List discrimination
Receiver operating characteristic
Signal detection theory
Memory models.
Description: Copyright © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
DOI: 10.1016/j.jml.2006.07.001
Description (link): http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/622888/description#description
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 6
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