Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/36543
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Type: Journal article
Title: Spectroscopic investigation of the adsorption mechanisms of polyacrylamide polymers onto iron oxide particles
Author: McGuire, Melanie Jane
Addai-Mensah, Jonas
Bremmell, Kristin Elizabeth
Citation: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, 2006; 299 (2):547-555
Publisher: Elsevier
Issue Date: 2006
ISSN: 0021-9797
School/Discipline: School of Chemical Engineering
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Melanie J. McGuire, Jonas Addai-Mensah and Kristen E. Bremmell
Abstract: The mechanisms of high-molecular-weight polyacrylamide nonionic homopolymer and 25 mol% anionic acrylate-substituted copolymer adsorption onto iron oxide particles were investigated via DRIFT and UV–vis spectroscopies at three pH values (6, 8.5, and 11). While electrostatic interactions play an important role in charged polymer adsorption, this information is not spectroscopically available. At pH values above and below pH 8.5 (the isoelectric point for the anionic polymer), bidentate chelation and hydrogen bonding were the main adsorption mechanisms. At the isoelectric point, monodentate chelation was observed to be the main mode of adsorption, along with hydrogen bonding. For the nonionic polymer, in all cases, hydrogen bonding through the carbonyl group was the main mode of adsorption. The adsorption of both polymers conformed well to the Freundlich model, suggesting that the adsorbed polymer amount increases with increasing polymer concentration up to 7500 g/t solid, rather than approaching monolayer coverage. Spectroscopic evidence was found to suggest that hydrolysis of nonionic polyacrylamide occurs at high pH.
Keywords: Polymer adsorption; Polyacrylamide; Hematite; Adsorption mechanism; Hydrolysis; Infrared spectroscopy
RMID: 0020065357
DOI: 10.1016/j.jcis.2006.03.015
Description (link): http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/622861/description#description
Appears in Collections:Chemical Engineering publications

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