Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/42272
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Type: Journal article
Title: Reoperation for dysphagia after cardiomyotomy for achalasia
Author: Grotenhuis, B.
Wijnhoven, B.
Myers, J.
Jamieson, G.
Devitt, P.
Watson, D.
Citation: American Journal of Surgery, 2007; 194(5):678-682
Publisher: Excerpta Medica Inc
Issue Date: 2007
ISSN: 0002-9610
1879-1883
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Brechtje A. Grotenhuis, Bas P.L. Wijnhoven, Jennifer C. Myers, Glyn G. Jamieson, Peter G. Devitt and David I. Watson
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Although laparoscopic cardiomyotomy is considered to be the treatment of choice for achalasia, there is no consensus about how persistent or recurrent dysphagia after myotomy should be treated. In the current study we evaluated our experience with reoperation following previous cardiomyotomy. METHODS: Between 1992 and 2006, 19 patients underwent re-myotomy: 7 for persistent dysphagia, 12 for recurrent dysphagia. Different operative approaches were used, depending on surgeon's preference and the technique used for the first operation. RESULTS: The mean interval between the cardiomyotomies was 81 months. In 12 patients, the alternative body cavity to that used for the first operation was used for access in the revision operation. This was associated with a shorter operation time. Mean follow-up after the revision operation was 3.6 years. Mean satisfaction score was 7 (out of 10), and 89% of patients had an improvement in symptoms. CONCLUSION: Reoperation for persistent or recurrent achalasia achieves a satisfactory outcome in most patients. Using the alternative body cavity to that used in the original procedure facilitates minimal access techniques, and gives easier access to the operative field.
Keywords: Esophagus; Humans; Deglutition Disorders; Esophageal Achalasia; Laparoscopy; Digestive System Surgical Procedures; Reoperation; Adult; Aged; Middle Aged; Female; Male
Description: Copyright © 2007 Excerpta Medica Inc. All rights reserved.
RMID: 0020073231
DOI: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2007.01.035
Description (link): http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/525051/description#description
Appears in Collections:Surgery publications

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