Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/46687
Type: Conference paper
Title: Towards Human and Social Innovation: Not Wanting to Know in Order to Create
Author: Hayward, P.
Ramos, J.
O'Connor, A.
Citation: Proceedings. Regional Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research 2007 : 4th International AGSE Entrepreneurship Research Exchange, 6–9, February, 2007: pp.303-304
Issue Date: 2007
ISBN: 9780980332803
Conference Name: AGSE International Entrepreneurship Research Exchange (4th : 2007 : Brisbane, QLD, Australia)
Organisation: Entrepreneurship, Commercialisation, and Innovation Centre
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Hayward, Peter; Ramos, Jose M. and O'Connor, Allan
Abstract: The formation of a venture relies, in part, upon the participants reaching a shared understanding of purpose and process. Yet in circumstances of great complexity and uncertainty how can such a shared understanding be created? If the response to complexity and uncertainty is to seek simplicity in order to find commonality then what is lost and what is at risk? Can shared understandings of purpose and process be arrived at by embracing complexity and uncertainty and if so how? These questions led us to explore the process of dialogue and communication of a team in its formative stages. Our interests were not centred upon the behavioural characteristics of the individuals in the 'forming' stage of group dynamics but rather the process of cognitive and linguistic turns, the wax and wan of ideas and, the formation of shared meaning. This process of cognitive and linguistic turns was focused thematically on the areas of foresight, innovation, entrepreneurship, and public policy. This cross disciplinary exploration sought to explore potential synergies between these domains, in particular in developing a conceptual basis for long term thinking that can inform wiser public policy.
RMID: 0020081838
Appears in Collections:Entrepreneurship, Commercialisation, and Innovation Centre publications

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