Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/47743
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Type: Journal article
Title: Gender and parental influences on the growth of a sexually dimorphic carnivorous marsupial
Author: Foster, W.
Taggart, D.
Citation: Journal of Zoology, 2008; 275(3):221-228
Publisher: Cambridge Univ Press
Issue Date: 2008
ISSN: 0952-8369
1469-7998
Statement of
Responsibility: 
W. K. Foster and D. A. Taggart
Abstract: The life histories of carnivorous marsupials, or dasyurids, make them useful subjects for studying maternal investment, such as sex ratio and lactational investment. One group of annual breeding dasyurids are male semelparous, strongly sexually dimorphic, produce large litters that weigh two to three times the weight of the mother at weaning and show biases in siring success and sex ratio. Red-tailed phascogales Phascogale calura belong to this group and in captivity they have shown biases in siring success with body weight. The growth rates of young of this species were investigated to determine whether sex-biased maternal investment occurs. No relationship was evident between maternal weight and the sex ratio of young, indicating no sex-ratio adjustment with maternal condition. In contrast, a positive relationship was evident between maternal weight and the weight of offspring at weaning, with weaning weight being correlated with weight at maturity. Dimorphism in weight emerged during suckling, with an average dimorphic ratio of 1.5 achieved by maturity. In contrast, dimorphism in skeletal measures did not emerge until after weaning, with an average dimorphic ratio of 1.14 achieved by maturity. The sex differences in growth during suckling provide support for a male bias in maternal investment.
Description: Journal compilation © 2008 The Zoological Society of London Copyright © 2008 The Authors.
RMID: 0020081631
DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-7998.2008.00429.x
Appears in Collections:Earth and Environmental Sciences publications

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