Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/48180
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Type: Journal article
Title: The loss of aquatic and riparian plant communities: implications for their consumers in a riverine food web
Author: Deegan, B.
Ganf, G.
Citation: Austral Ecology, 2008; 33(5):672-683
Publisher: Blackwell Science Asia
Issue Date: 2008
ISSN: 1442-9985
1442-9993
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Brian M. Deegan and George G. Ganf
Abstract: Human induced alterations to rivers and steams have resulted in significant changes to the structure and diversity of riparian and aquatic plant communities. These changes will impact on the dynamics of riverine carbon cycles and food web structure and function. Here we investigate the principal sources of organic carbon supporting local shredder communities across a gradient in different levels of anthropogenic development along riverine reaches, in South Australia. In forested/wooded reaches with minimum to limited development, semi-emergent macrophytes were the principal sources of organic carbon supporting the local shredder communities. However, in developed reaches, course particulate organic matter and filamentous algae were the principal food sources. The C:N ratios of the food sources in developed reaches were higher than those of their consumers indicating a stoichiometric mismatch. This imbalanced consumer-resource nutrient ratio in those developed reaches is likely to impose constraints on the growth and reproduction of their aquatic shredder communities with probable knock-on effects to higher trophic levels.
Keywords: aquatic macrophyte; ecological stoichiometry; organic carbon; shredder; stable isotope
Description: Copyright © 2008 The Authors Journal compilation © 2008 Ecological Society of Australia
RMID: 0020081560
DOI: 10.1111/j.1442-9993.2008.01834.x
Appears in Collections:Earth and Environmental Sciences publications

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