Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/51034
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dc.contributor.authorPearce, K.-
dc.contributor.authorNoakes, M.-
dc.contributor.authorKeogh, J.-
dc.contributor.authorClifton, P.-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2008; 87(3):638-644-
dc.identifier.issn0002-9165-
dc.identifier.issn1938-3207-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/51034-
dc.description.abstract<h4>Background</h4>Large postprandial glucose peaks are associated with increased risk of diabetic complications and cardiovascular disease.<h4>Objective</h4>We investigated the effect of carbohydrate distribution on postprandial glucose peaks with continuous blood glucose monitoring (CGMS), when consuming a moderate carbohydrate diet in energy balance in subjects with type 2 diabetes.<h4>Design</h4>Twenty-three subjects with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to each of four 3-d interventions in a crossover design with a 4-d washout period. Identical foods were provided for each treatment with a ratio of total carbohydrate to protein to fat of 40%:34%:26% but differing in carbohydrate content at each meal: even distribution (CARB-E; approximately 70 g carbohydrate), breakfast (CARB-B), lunch (CARB-L), and dinner(CARB-D), each providing approximately 125 g carbohydrate in the loaded meal in a 9-MJ diet. Glucose concentrations were continuously measured with CGMS. Outcomes were assessed by postprandial peak glucose (G(max)), time spent > 12 mmol/L (T > 12), and total area under the glucose curve (AUC(20)).<h4>Results</h4>Daily G(max) differed between treatments (P = 0.003) with CARB-L (14.2 +/- 1.0 mmol/L), CARB-E (14.5 +/- 0.9 mmol/L), and CARB-D (14.6 +/- 0.8 mmol/L) being similar but lower than CARB-B (16.5 +/- 0.8 mmol/L). Meal G(max) was weakly related to carbohydrate amount and glycemic load (r = 0.40-0.44). T > 12 differed between treatments (P = 0.014), and a treatment x fasting blood glucose (FBG) interaction (P = 0.003) was observed with CARB-L (184 +/- 74 min) < CARB-B (190 +/- 49 min) < CARB-D (234 +/- 87 min) < CARB-E (262 +/- 91 min). Total AUC(20) was not significantly different between treatments. After adjustment for FBG, treatment became significant (P = 0.006); CARB-L (10 049 +/- 718 mmol/L x 20 h) < CARB-E (10 493 +/- 706 mmol/L x 20 h) < CARB-B (10 603 +/- 642 mmol/L x 20 h) < CARB-D (10 717 +/- 638 mmol/L x 20 h).<h4>Conclusion</h4>CARB-E did not optimize blood glucose control as assessed by postprandial peaks, whereas CARB-L provided the most favorable postprandial profile.-
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityKarma L. Pearce, Manny Noakes, Jennifer Keogh and Peter M. Clifton-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherAmer Soc Clinical Nutrition-
dc.source.urihttp://www.ajcn.org/cgi/content/abstract/87/3/638-
dc.subjectType 2 diabetes-
dc.subjectcarbohydrate distribution-
dc.subjectmoderate carbohydrate diet-
dc.subjectcontinuous glucose monitoring-
dc.subjectenergy balance-
dc.subjectpostprandial blood glucose.-
dc.titleEffect of carbohydrate distribution on postprandial glucose peaks with the use of continuous glucose monitoring in type 2 diabetes-
dc.typeJournal article-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ajcn/87.3.638-
pubs.publication-statusPublished-
dc.identifier.orcidClifton, P. [0000-0002-6411-626X]-
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