Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/54671
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dc.contributor.authorClarke, B.en
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, N.en
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.citationIAIA08 The Art and Science of Impact Assessment, 28th Annual Conference of the International Association for Impact Assessment held on the 4–10 May 2008, Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre in Perth, Western Australia / J. Pope and A. Morrison-Saunders (eds.):www1-5en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/54671-
dc.descriptionInvalid ISBN 9781980035117 as shown on the publicationen
dc.description.abstractDirectly involving the public in environmental decision-making is now a prerequisite for most government agency programs and initiatives. However, ambiguities exist about appropriate methods of engagement and how much public involvement in decision making is a good thing. Public participation is considered to be essential criteria for best practice EIA. Benefits for both the public and the proponent (or developer) have been increasingly recognised. The following paper questions the role and effectiveness of public involvement in EIA in South Australia. While public participation is recognised within the legislation and various opportunities exist within the South Australian system for the public to be involved in the process, initial analysis of EIA practice suggests that formal methods of public engagement may not influence the process as perhaps they should. A brief overview of South Australian mechanisms and practice is presented. A case study highlights how both formal and informal participatory methods were unable to influence a decision to the satisfaction of the local community. The paper concludes that a comprehensive analysis is required to determine the relative value of submissions versus informal methods of participation and how public involvement has influenced the decision making outcomes for major projects in South Australia.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityBeverley Clarke and Nick Harveyen
dc.description.urihttp://www.iaia.org/iaia08perth/en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIAIAen
dc.titleFormal vs informal participatory EIA methods: a South Australian case studyen
dc.typeConference paperen
dc.contributor.conferenceInternational Association for Impact Assessment Conference (2008 : Perth, W.A)en
dc.publisher.placeUSAen
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 5
Geography, Environment and Population publications

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