Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/54758
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Type: Journal article
Title: Comparison of high- and low-fidelity mannequins for clinical performance assessment
Author: Lee, K.
Grantham, H.
Boyd, R.
Citation: Emergency Medicine Australasia (Print Edition), 2008; 20(6):508-514
Publisher: Blackwell Science Asia Pty Ltd
Issue Date: 2008
ISSN: 1742-6731
1742-6723
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Kenneth Hee King Lee, Hugh Grantham and Russell Boyd
Abstract: <h4>Objective</h4>A pilot study exploring the differences between high- and low-fidelity mannequins in the assessment of clinical performance.<h4>Methods</h4>Standardized clinical scenarios were used to test 12 intensive care paramedics (ICP). Each ICP was randomly assigned to a scenario using either a high-fidelity (SimMan) or low-fidelity mannequin (Laerdal Heart Start 2000), followed by a crossover assessment using the alternative scenario. We examined both the objective and subjective outcomes. Objective performance was assessed by three independent assessors, all accredited Advanced Paediatric Life Support instructors. Subjective outcomes were measured by assessment questionnaires and a rating scale.<h4>Results</h4>The overall proportion that passed the high-fidelity mannequin scenario was 0.47 compared with 0.58 in the low-fidelity mannequin scenario. The difference was -0.11 (95% CI -0.32-0.11). The subjective outcomes were charted and presented within the article. The ICP preferred the use of high-fidelity mannequin for assessment purpose.<h4>Conclusion</h4>There was no significant objective difference between the two mannequins.
Keywords: Humans; Prospective Studies; Cross-Over Studies; Equipment Design; Emergency Medicine; Education, Medical, Continuing; Clinical Competence; Teaching; Manikins
Description: The definitive version may be found at www.wiley.com
RMID: 0020084211
DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-6723.2008.01137.x
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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