Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/57109
Type: Thesis
Title: New approaches to investigate and construct biogeochemical models of inland acid sulfate soils: linkages to environmental degradation processes and mineral exploration.
Author: Baker, Andrew Kenneth Martin
Issue Date: 2007
School/Discipline: School of Earth and Environmental Sciences : Soil and Land Systems
Abstract: "Inland acidic sulfate soils under fresh water conditions where contemporary clearning of native vegetation has caused erosion, rising of local water tables and excess discharge of saline-sulfatic groundwater. A new systematic and interactive web-based approach was used to improve acquisition, collation, integration and communication of diverse soil-regolith data ... Successful application of the interactive web-based data site, as part of this study, resulted in its uptake as a standard tool for coordinating and reporting on a number of current and future national and international soil-regolith studies." -- from Abstract.
Dissertation Note: Thesis (Ph.D.) -- University of Adelaide, School of Earth and Enviromental Sciences, 2007
Keywords: acid sulphate soils; soils research; biogeochemistry
Provenance: This electronic version is made publicly available by the University of Adelaide in accordance with its open access policy for student theses. Copyright in this thesis remains with the author. This thesis may incorporate third party material which has been used by the author pursuant to Fair Dealing exception. If you are the author of this thesis and do not wish it to be made publicly available or If you are the owner of any included third party copyright material you wish to be removed from this electronic version, please complete the take down form located at: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/legals
Appears in Collections:Research Theses

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
01front.pdf68.64 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
02whole.pdf31.04 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
03Data.zip493.85 MBZip fileView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.