Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/58008
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Type: Journal article
Title: Mental health and alcohol and other drug training for emergency department workers: one solution to help manage increasing demand
Author: King, D.
Kalucy, R.
de Crespigny, C.
Stuhlmiller, C.
Thomas, L.
Citation: Emergency Medicine Australasia (Print Edition), 2004; 16(2):155-160
Publisher: Blackwell Science Asia Pty Ltd
Issue Date: 2004
ISSN: 1742-6731
1742-6723
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Diane L. King, Ross S. Kalucy, Charlotte F. de Crespigny, Cynthia M. Stuhlmiller and Lyndall J. Thomas
Abstract: <h4>Objective</h4>To evaluate a training course for ED staff aiming to improve knowledge and skills in working with mental health and drug/alcohol patients attending EDs.<h4>Methods</h4>Pre- and postcourse questionnaires assessed attitudes and self-ratings of confidence, knowledge and skills in working with these patients. Follow-up interviews assessed if new skills or approaches to patient management had been integrated into daily ED practice.<h4>Results</h4>Little change was observed in the course participants' attitudes, although reported attitudes were generally appropriate. Self-ratings of confidence in skills and knowledge showed a significant improvement on all questions following the course. Responses to the follow-up interviews suggest course information has been retained and integrated into practice, especially in conducting triage and other assessments and taking more time to talk to patients.<h4>Conclusion</h4>The course has led to staff feeling more confident and competent to help mental health or drug/alcohol patients who attend the ED.
Keywords: alcohol and other drugs; emergency departments; mental health; staff training
Rights: © 2004 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.
RMID: 0020095979
DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-6723.2004.00568.x
Appears in Collections:Nursing publications

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