Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/58203
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dc.contributor.authorGreen, A.en
dc.contributor.authorGreenhalgh, S.en
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.identifier.citationFirst Break, 2009; 27(JULY):43-50en
dc.identifier.issn0263-5046en
dc.identifier.issn1365-2397en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/58203-
dc.description.abstractOver the past five years, established techniques for estimating the resonant frequencies and S-wave velocities of shallow soil/sediment layers using microtremor spectra in the 1-10 Hz frequency range have been implicitly challenged by members of an industry-university consortium who claim that these same spectra can be used to map the detailed locations, depths, and thicknesses of hydrocarbon-rich sediments. But recently published spectral attributes based on 1-10 Hz microtremor recordings and associated analyses suggest that any microtremor signals originating from relatively deep hydrocarbon reservoirs are likely to be overwhelmed by surface-waves and other seismic energy travelling through the near-surface soil/sediment layers.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityAlan Green and Stewart Greenhalghen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEuropean Association of Geoscientists and Engineersen
dc.rights© 2009 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers (EAGE)en
dc.source.urihttp://fb.eage.org/content.php?id=29025en
dc.titleMicrotremor spectra: A proven means for estimating resonant frequencies and S-wave velocities of shallow soils/sediments, but a questionable tool for locating hydrocarbon reservoirsen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0020092212en
dc.identifier.doi10.3997/1365-2397.2009012en
dc.identifier.pubid37858-
pubs.library.collectionChemistry and Physics publicationsen
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
Appears in Collections:Chemistry and Physics publications

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