Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/58229
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Type: Journal article
Title: Gene expression microarray analysis of early oxygen-induced retinopathy in the rat
Author: Tea, M.
Fogarty, R.
Brereton, H.
Michael, M.
Van der Hoek, M.
Tsykin, A.
Coster, D.
Williams, K.
Citation: Journal of Ocular Biology, Diseases, and Informatics, 2009; 2(4):190-201
Publisher: Humana Press, Inc.
Issue Date: 2009
ISSN: 1936-8445
1936-8445
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Melinda Tea, Rhys Fogarty, Helen M. Brereton, Michael Z. Michael, Mark B. Van der Hoek, Anna Tsykin, Douglas J. Coster and Keryn A. Williams
Abstract: Different inbred strains of rat differ in their susceptibility to oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), an animal model of human retinopathy of prematurity. We examined gene expression in Sprague–Dawley (susceptible) and Fischer 344 (resistant) neonatal rats after 3 days exposure to cyclic hyperoxia or room air, using Affymetrix rat Genearrays. False discovery rate analysis was used to identify differentially regulated genes. Such genes were then ranked by fold change and submitted to the online database, DAVID. The Sprague–Dawley list returned the term “response to hypoxia,” absent from the Fischer 344 output. Manual analysis indicated that many genes known to be upregulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α were downregulated by cyclic hyperoxia. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis of Egln3, Bnip3, Slc16a3, and Hk2 confirmed the microarray results. We conclude that combined methodologies are required for adequate dissection of the pathophysiology of strain susceptibility to OIR in the rat.
Keywords: Cyclic hyperoxia
gene expression
oxygen-induced retinopathy
Affymetrix microarray
inbred rat
Rights: © The Author(s) 2009. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com
DOI: 10.1007/s12177-009-9041-7
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 5
Molecular and Biomedical Science publications

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