Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/58822
Citations
Scopus Web of ScienceĀ® Altmetric
?
?
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorO'Donnell, M.en
dc.contributor.authorCreamer, M.en
dc.contributor.authorElliott, P.en
dc.contributor.authorBryant, R.en
dc.contributor.authorMcFarlane, A.en
dc.contributor.authorSilove, D.en
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Trauma: injury, infection and critical carw, 2009; 2009(66):470-476en
dc.identifier.issn0022-5282en
dc.identifier.issn1529-8809en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/58822-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Preliminary evidence suggests that injury survivors are at increased risk for having experienced traumatic events before their injury or having a lifetime psychiatric history. We aimed to extend the previous research by examining in the same sample whether trauma history or lifetime psychiatric history represented risk pathways to injury for intentional or unintentional injury survivors. We also aimed to describe the co-occurrence between trauma history and psychiatric history in unintentionally injured survivors. METHODS: In this multisited study, randomly selected injury survivors admitted to five trauma services in three states of Australia (April 2004 to February 2006) completed two structured clinical interviews that assessed their history of traumatic life events and lifetime psychiatric disorder (n = 1,167). chi analyses were conducted to compare the lifetime prevalence of traumatic events and psychiatric history for intentional and unintentional injury with population norms. RESULTS: Both intentional and unintentional injury survivors were at increased risk for reporting all types of trauma and reporting all measured psychiatric diagnoses compared with population norms. The majority of unintentional injury survivors with a psychiatric history were likely to have a trauma history. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we identified that prior trauma or prior psychiatric illness may represent risk for injury in both intentionally and unintentionally injured survivors. The results highlight the need for injury-care services to address mental health issues in injury patients as part of routine care.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityM.L. O'Donnell, M. Creamer, P. Elliott, R. Bryant, A. McFarlane, D. Siloveen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkinsen
dc.rightsCopyright status unknownen
dc.subjectUnintentional injury; Psychiatric history; Traumatic events historyen
dc.titlePrior trauma and psychiatric history as risk factors for intentional and unintentional injury in Australiaen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0020096734en
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/TA.0b013e31815d965een
dc.identifier.pubid34863-
pubs.library.collectionMedicine publicationsen
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.