Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/6047
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Type: Journal article
Title: Core temperature changes during open and laparoscopic colorectal surgery
Author: Luck, A.
Moyes, D.
Maddern, G.
Hewett, P.
Citation: Surgical Endoscopy, 1999; 13(5):480-483
Publisher: SPRINGER VERLAG
Issue Date: 1999
ISSN: 0930-2794
1432-2218
Statement of
Responsibility: 
A. J. Luck, D. Moyes, G. J. Maddern, P. J. Hewett
Abstract: BACKGROUND:Perioperative hypothermia increases the morbidity of surgery. However, the true incidence of hypothermia during prolonged laparoscopic surgery is still unknown. To investigate this issue, we compared the temperature change between patients undergoing open and laparoscopic colorectal surgery. METHODS:Sixty consecutive patients who were undergoing laparoscopic (33) or open (27) colorectal surgery had a transesophageal temperature probe placed after induction of anesthesia. Core temperature values were measured at 15-min intervals. RESULTS:The groups were not statistically different with respect to age, sex, body surface area, or initial transesophageal temperature. The type of surgical access (open or laparoscopic) caused no difference in the incidence of hypothermia. The use of a forced-air warming device produced significantly less hypothermia during laparoscopic surgery. Men showed significantly less variability in temperature change than women. CONCLUSIONS:The incidence of hypothermia in open and laparoscopic colorectal surgery is similar. Forced-air warming devices are of value in prolonged laparoscopic surgery. A gender difference in the response to a hypothermic situation has not been previously reported. This finding warrants further investigation.
Keywords: Hypothermia; Laparoscopic surgery; Bair Hugger
Rights: © Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1999
RMID: 0030006062
DOI: 10.1007/s004649901017
Appears in Collections:Anaesthesia and Intensive Care publications

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