Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/61129
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Type: Journal article
Title: Polycystic ovary syndrome and weight management
Author: Moran, L.
Lombard, C.
Lim, S.
Noakes, M.
Teede, H.
Citation: Women's Health (London, 2005), 2010; 6(2):271-283
Publisher: Future Medicine Ltd.
Issue Date: 2010
ISSN: 1745-5057
1745-5065
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Lisa J. Moran‌, Catherine B. Lombard‌, Siew Lim‌, Manny Noakes‌ & Helena J. Teede‌
Abstract: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common condition in women of reproductive age, and has reproductive, metabolic and psychological implications. Weight gain and obesity worsen the features of PCOS, while weight loss improves the features of PCOS. While there are potential barriers to successful weight management in young women who do not suffer from PCOS, women with PCOS may experience additional barriers. Weight management strategies in younger women with or without PCOS should encompass both the prevention of excess weight gain and achieving and maintaining a reduced weight through multidisciplinary lifestyle management, comprising dietary, exercise and behavioral therapy, as well as attention to psychosocial stress and practical and physiological barriers to weight management. Further research is warranted in the examination of specific barriers to weight management in women with PCOS, as well as in the determination of optimal components of lifestyle weight management interventions in young women in order to facilitate long-term compliance.
Keywords: Humans; Polycystic Ovary Syndrome; Weight Loss; Body Mass Index; Exercise; Attitude to Health; Stress, Psychological; Health Behavior; Life Style; Behavior Therapy; Comorbidity; Health Education; Adult; Middle Aged; Women's Health; Female; Overweight
Rights: Copyright status unknown
RMID: 0020095703
DOI: 10.2217/whe.09.89
Appears in Collections:Obstetrics and Gynaecology publications

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