Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/61237
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Centralization and the relationship between volume and outcome in knee arthroplasty procedures
Author: Marlow, N.
Barraclough, B.
Collier, N.
Dickinson, I.
Fawcett, J.
Graham, J.
Maddern, G.
Citation: ANZ Journal of Surgery, 2010; 80(4):234-241
Publisher: Blackwell Science Asia
Issue Date: 2010
ISSN: 1445-1433
1445-2197
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Nicholas E. Marlow, Bruce Barraclough, Neil A. Collier, Ian C. Dickinson, Jonathon Fawcett, John C. Graham and Guy J. Maddern
Abstract: <h4>Background</h4>Centralization aims to reduce adverse patient outcomes by concentrating complex surgical procedures in specified hospitals.<h4>Objectives</h4>This review assessed the efficacy of centralization for knee arthroplasty by examining the relationship between hospital and surgeon volume and patient outcomes.<h4>Data sources and review methods</h4>The systematic review identified studies using multiple databases, including Medline and Embase. Two independent researchers ensured studies met the inclusion criteria. Morbidity, mortality, length of stay, financial outcomes and statistical rigour were examined. Correlations between volume and outcome were reported.<h4>Results</h4>Twelve primary knee arthroplasty studies examined hospital volume, which was significantly associated with decreased morbidity (five of seven studies), mortality (two of five studies) and length of stay (two of three studies). Three primary knee arthroplasty studies examined surgeon volume, which was significantly associated with decreased morbidity (two of three studies), mortality (zero of two studies) and length of stay (one of one study). Two revision knee arthroplasty studies examined hospital volume. One study examined but did not test for significance between hospital volume and patient morbidity; both studies examined volume and patient mortality reporting inconclusive results; and one study reported no significant association between volume and length of stay. None of the revision knee arthroplasty studies examined surgeon volume.<h4>Conclusions</h4>Significant associations between increased hospital and surgeon volume and improved patient outcomes were reported. However, when these results were separated by arthroplasty type, the association appeared tenuous. Judgements regarding centralization of knee arthroplasty should be made with caution until further evidence is published.
Keywords: arthroplasty
knee replacement
orthopedics
review
surgery
Rights: © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
DOI: 10.1111/j.1445-2197.2010.05243.x
Published version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1445-2197.2010.05243.x
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest
Surgery publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.