Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/61929
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Type: Journal article
Title: Measuring the context of care in an Australian acute care hospital: a nurse survey
Author: Schultz, T.
Kitson, A.
Citation: Implementation Science, 2010; 5(1):60-1-60-11
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd
Issue Date: 2010
ISSN: 1748-5908
1748-5908
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Timothy J. Schultz and Alison L. Kitson
Abstract: BACKGROUND: This study set out to achieve three objectives: to test the application of a context assessment tool in an acute hospital in South Australia; to use the tool to compare context in wards that had undergone an evidence implementation process with control wards; and finally to test for relationships between demographic variables (in particular experience) of nurses being studied (n = 422) with the dimensions of context. METHODS: The Alberta Context Tool (ACT) was administered to all nursing staff on six control and six intervention wards. A total of 217 (62%) were returned (67% from the intervention wards and 56% from control wards). Data were analysed using Stata (v9). The effect of the intervention was analysed using nested (hierarchical) analysis of variance; relationships between nurses' experience and context was examined using canonical correlation analysis. RESULTS: Results confirmed the adaptation and fit of the ACT to one acute care setting in South Australia. There was no difference in context scores between control and intervention wards. However, the tool identified significant variation between wards in many of the dimensions of context. Though significant, the relationship between nurses' experience and context was weak, suggesting that at the level of the individual nurse, few factors are related to context. CONCLUSIONS: Variables operating at the level of the individual showed little relationship with context. However, the study indicated that some dimensions of context (e.g., leadership, culture) vary at the ward level, whereas others (e.g., structural and electronic resources) do not. The ACT also raised a number of interesting speculative hypotheses around the relationship between a measure of context and the capability and capacity of staff to influence it.
Rights: © 2010 Schultz and Kitson; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
RMID: 0020100975
DOI: 10.1186/1748-5908-5-60
Appears in Collections:Nursing publications

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