Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/62315
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Type: Journal article
Title: Lower age at menarche affects survival in older Australian women: results from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Ageing
Author: Giles, L.
Glonek, G.
Moore, V.
Davies, M.
Luszcz, M.
Citation: BMC Public Health, 2010; 10(341):1-10
Publisher: BioMed Central
Issue Date: 2010
ISSN: 1471-2458
1471-2458
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Lynne C Giles, Gary FV Glonek, Vivienne M Moore, Michael J Davies and Mary A Luszcz
Abstract: Background: While menarche indicates the beginning of a woman's reproductive life, relatively little is known about the association between age at menarche and subsequent morbidity and mortality. We aimed to examine the effect of lower age at menarche on all-cause mortality in older Australian women over 15 years of follow-up. Methods: Data were drawn from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Ageing (n = 1,031 women aged 65-103 years). We estimated the hazard ratio (HR) associated with lower age at menarche using Cox proportional hazards models, and adjusted for a broad range of reproductive, demographic, health and lifestyle covariates. Results: During the follow-up period, 673 women (65%) died (average 7.3 years (SD 4.1) of follow-up for decedents). Women with menses onset < 12 years of age (10.7%; n = 106) had an increased hazard of death over the follow-up period (adjusted HR 1.28; 95%CI 0.99-1.65) compared with women who began menstruating aged ≥ 12 years (89.3%; n = 883). However, when age at menarche was considered as a continuous variable, the adjusted HRs associated with the linear and quadratic terms for age at menarche were not statistically significant at a 5% level of significance (linear HR 0.76; 95%CI 0.56 - 1.04; quadratic HR 1.01; 95%CI 1.00-1.02). Conclusion: Women with lower age at menarche may have reduced survival into old age. These results lend support to the known associations between earlier menarche and risk of metabolic disease in early adulthood. Strategies to minimise earlier menarche, such as promoting healthy weights and minimising family dysfunction during childhood, may also have positive longer-term effects on survival in later life.
Keywords: Humans
Metabolic Diseases
Mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk Factors
Longitudinal Studies
Life Style
Age Factors
Aging
Menarche
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Women's Health
Australia
Female
Male
Description: Extent: 10p.
Rights: Copyright 2010 Giles et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative CommonsAttribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-10-341
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP0669272
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP0879152
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/229922
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/465437
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/465455
Published version: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953364406&partnerID=40&md5=dd3285f11c426f8a54dd445a9b3e2e1d
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