Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/62672
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Type: Journal article
Title: Spiral wave breakup in excitable media with an inhomogeneity of conduction anisotropy
Author: Kuklik, P.
Szumowski, L.
Sanders, P.
Zebrowski, J.
Citation: Computers in Biology and Medicine, 2010; 40(9):775-780
Publisher: Pergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd
Issue Date: 2010
ISSN: 0010-4825
1879-0534
Statement of
Responsibility: 
P. Kuklik, L. Szumowski, P. Sanders, J.J. Żebrowski
Abstract: Many conditions remodel the heart muscle such that it results in a perturbation of cells coupling. The effect of this perturbation on the stability of the spiral waves of electrochemical activity is not clear. We used the FitzHugh-Nagumo model of an excitable medium to model the conduction of the activation waves in a two-dimensional system with inhomogeneous anisotropy level. Inhomogeneity of the anisotropy level was modeled by adding Gaussian noise to diffusion coefficients corresponding with lateral coupling of the cells. Low noise levels resulted in a stable propagation of the spiral wave. For large noise level conduction was not possible due to insufficient coupling in direction perpendicular to fibers. For intermediate noise intensities, the initial wave broke up into several independent spiral waves or waves circulating around conduction obstacles. At an optimal noise intensity, the number of wavelets was maximized-a form of anti-coherent resonance was obtained. Our results suggest that the inhomogeneity of conduction anisotropy may promote wave breakup and hence play an important role in the initiation and perpetuation of the cardiac arrhythmias.
Keywords: Inhomogeneous excitable media; Spiral wave dynamics; Spiral wave breakup; Atrial fibrillation; Heart arrhythmias
Rights: Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
RMID: 0020101107
DOI: 10.1016/j.compbiomed.2010.07.005
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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