Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/62807
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dc.contributor.authorChen, J.en
dc.contributor.authorBellomo, R.en
dc.contributor.authorHillman, K.en
dc.contributor.authorFlabouris, A.en
dc.contributor.authorFinfer, S.en
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Critical Care, 2010; 25(2):1-7en
dc.identifier.issn0883-9441en
dc.identifier.issn1557-8615en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/62807-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to examine triggers for emergency team activation in hospitals with or without a medical emergency team (MET) system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Within a cluster randomized controlled trial examining the effect of introducing a MET system, we recorded the triggers for emergency team activation. We compared the proportion and rate of such triggers in hospitals with or without a MET system and in relation to type of hospital, type of patient ward, and time of day. RESULTS: In control hospitals, the most common trigger for emergency team activation was a decrease in Glasgow Coma Score by 2 or more points (45.6%), whereas in MET hospitals, it was the fact that staff members were "worried" or the call occurred despite the lack of a "specified reason" (39.3%). In particular, MET hospitals were 35 times more likely to make a call because of staff being "worried" about the patient (14.1% vs 0.4%, P < .001). Control hospitals were also significantly more likely to call an emergency team because of a deteriorating respiratory (P = .003) or pulse (P < .001) rate, more calls had at least 3 triggers for activation (20.8% vs 10.2%, P = .036), and the average number of triggers per call was significantly higher (P = .013). Nonmetropolitan hospitals were more likely to call an emergency team because of respiratory rate abnormalities (33.6% vs 23.2%, P = .015). Coronary care unit calls were more likely to be triggered by abnormalities in pulse rate and systolic blood pressure, and more calls occurred during the period from 6:00 am to noon. CONCLUSIONS: In MET hospitals, more emergency team calls are triggered because staff members are worried about the patient; and fewer calls have multiple triggers. Type of hospital, type of ward, and time of day also affect the nature and frequency of triggers for emergency team activation.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityJack Chen, Rinaldo Bellomo, Ken Hillman, Arthas Flabouris, Simon Finfer, the MERIT Study Investigators for the Simpson Centre and the ANZICS Clinical Trials Groupen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherW B Saunders Coen
dc.rightsCopyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectMedical emergency team; Rapid response system; Rapid response team; Critical careen
dc.titleTriggers for emergency team activation: A multicenter assessmenten
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0020101299en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jcrc.2009.12.011en
dc.identifier.pubid33020-
pubs.library.collectionAnaesthesia and Intensive Care publicationsen
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.identifier.orcidFlabouris, A. [0000-0002-1535-9441]en
Appears in Collections:Anaesthesia and Intensive Care publications

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