Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/64918
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Polycystic ovary syndrome: a biopsychosocial understanding in young women to improve knowledge and treatment options
Author: Moran, L.
Gibson-Helm, M.
Teede, H.
Deeks, A.
Citation: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2010; 31(1):24-31
Publisher: Parthenon Publishing Group
Issue Date: 2010
ISSN: 0167-482X
1743-8942
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Lisa Moran, Melanie Gibson-Helm, Helena Teede and Amanda Deeks
Abstract: Aim: To assess psychological features in young women with and without PCOS. Methods: Observational, cross-sectional pilot study in young women aged 18–25 with (n = 24) or without (n = 22) PCOS (age: 22.41 ± 0.39 vs. 21.95 ± 0.47 years, p = 0.46; BMI: 29.17 ± 1.54 vs. 22.05 ± 0.83 kg/m2, p = 0.0003). The main outcome measures were quality of life, anxiety, depression, risk perception and fears on future health. Results: Women with PCOS demonstrated worsened quality of life (p = 0.033) and greater anxiety (p = 0.01) and depression (p = 0.023) than women without PCOS related to BMI status. Women with PCOS were more likely to perceive themselves as at risk of obesity (p = 0.012) and infertility (p < 0.0001), and perceived greater importance in reducing future risk of prediabetes (p = 0.027), gestational diabetes (p = 0.039), type 2 diabetes (p = 0.01), heart disease (p = 0.005), obesity (p = 0.0007) and infertility (p = 0.023) than women without PCOS. Women with PCOS were more likely to have fears about future health related to weight gain (p = 0.045), loss of femininity (p = 0.035), loss of sexuality (p = 0.003) and infertility (p = 0.019) than women without PCOS. Conclusions: Worsened quality of life, anxiety and depression in young women with PCOS is related to BMI. Risk perception is appropriately high in PCOS, yet perceived risks of future metabolic complications are less common than those related to weight gain and infertility.
Keywords: Polycystic ovary syndrome; women’s health; psychological wellbeing; endocrinology
Rights: Copyright 2010 Informa UK Ltd.
RMID: 0020109763
DOI: 10.3109/01674820903477593
Appears in Collections:Obstetrics and Gynaecology publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.