Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/65892
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Type: Journal article
Title: Risk factors for dogs becoming rectal carriers of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli during hospitalization
Author: Gibson, J.
Morton, J.
Cobbold, R.
Filippich, L.
Trott, D.
Citation: Epidemiology and Infection, 2011; 139(10):1511-1521
Publisher: Cambridge Univ Press
Issue Date: 2011
ISSN: 0950-2688
1469-4409
Statement of
Responsibility: 
J. S. Gibson, J. M.Morton, R. N. Cobbold, L. J. Filippich and D. J. Trott
Abstract: This study aimed to identify risk factors for dogs becoming rectal carriers of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli while hospitalized in a veterinary teaching hospital. Exposures to potential risk factors, including treatments, hospitalization, and interventions during a 42-day pre-admission period and hospitalization variables, were assessed for 90 cases and 93 controls in a retrospective, risk-based, case-control study. On multivariable analyses, hospitalization for >6 days [odds ratio (OR) 2.91–8.00], treatment with cephalosporins prior to admission (OR 5.04, 95% CI 1.25–20.27), treatment with cephalosporins for >1 day (OR 5.18, 95% CI 1.86–14.41), and treatment with metronidazole (OR 7.17, 95% CI 1.01–50.79) while hospitalized were associated with increased risk of rectal carriage of MDR E. coli during hospitalization. The majority of rectal isolates obtained during the study period conformed to MDR E. coli clonal groups previously obtained from extraintestinal infections. These results can assist the development of improved infection control guidelines for the management of dogs in veterinary hospitals to prevent the occurrence of nosocomial clinical infections.
Keywords: Domestic pets; E. coli; epidemiology; nosocomial.
Rights: Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010
RMID: 0020106637
DOI: 10.1017/S0950268810002785
Appears in Collections:Animal and Veterinary Sciences publications

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