Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/66305
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: In situ hybridization to detect bandicoot papillomatosis carcinomatosis virus type 1 in biopsies from endangered western barred bandicoots (Perameles bougainville)
Author: Bennett, M.
Woolford, L.
O'Hara, A.
Warren, K.
Nicholls, P.
Citation: Journal of General Virology, 2008; 89(2):419-423
Publisher: Soc General Microbiology
Issue Date: 2008
ISSN: 0022-1317
1465-2099
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Mark D. Bennett, Lucy Woolford, Amanda J. O’Hara, Kristin S. Warren and Philip K. Nicholls
Abstract: The western barred bandicoot (Perameles bougainville) is an endangered Australian marsupial species in which a papillomatosis and carcinomatosis syndrome occurs. Bandicoot papillomatosis carcinomatosis virus type 1 (BPCV1) is associated with the lesions of this progressively debilitating syndrome. Five digoxigenin-labelled DNA probes were generated for in situ hybridization (ISH) and the technique was optimized and performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) biopsies. Staining of keratinocyte and sebocyte nuclei within lesions was achieved with all five probes. The sensitivity of ISH (76.9 %) surpassed that of PCR (30.8 %) for FFPE samples. The sensitivity of ISH varied from 81 % (papillomas) and 70 % (carcinoma in situ) to 29 % (squamous cell carcinomas). The specificity of the test was confirmed using an irrelevant probe and papillomas from other species. These results strengthen the association between BPCV1 and the western barred bandicoot papillomatosis and carcinomatosis syndrome and give insight into the biology of the virus–host interaction.
Keywords: Animals; Marsupialia; Papillomaviridae; Carcinoma; Papilloma; Biopsy; In Situ Hybridization; Paraffin Embedding; Tissue Fixation
Rights: © 2008 SGM
RMID: 0020105793
DOI: 10.1099/vir.0.83455-0
Appears in Collections:Animal and Veterinary Sciences publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.