Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/66566
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Type: Book chapter
Title: Academic migration: the case of new australian universities
Author: Potts, A.
Citation: International Perspectives on Higher Education Research, 3rd edn, 2005 / pp.159-183
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Ltd
Publisher Place: UK
Issue Date: 2005
Series/Report no.: International perspectives on higher education research, 1479-3628 ; v. 3
ISBN: 9780762312443
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Anthony Potts
Abstract: Currently a number of countries around the world grapple with the alleged issues of “brain drain” and “brain gain”. These twin areas are especially felt in smaller nations such as Australia. They are particularly the subject of analysis with respect to the academic profession, which seeks to recruit the next generation of academics in an increasingly global and competitive world. Academic migration itself is not a new issue being as old as the profession itself. What perhaps is novel is that in a mass system of higher education with a great diversity of institutional types migration and migration decisions are even less one-dimensional than perhaps they once, if ever, were. If ever academic migrants were motivated only by academic decisions in making their migration choices does this also apply to those who work in newer and less traditional universities. This study using life history methods examines academic migrants and their migration choices with reference to two new Australian universities. The data is related to the wider literature on recent migration studies and academic migration. Questions are posed and conclusions drawn for academic recruitment by universities facing the challenges posed by imminent large-scale retirement of academic staff
Rights: (c) Emerald Group Publishing Limited
RMID: 0020109234
DOI: 10.1016/S1479-3628(05)03007-8
Appears in Collections:Economics publications

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