Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/66674
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Type: Journal article
Title: Plasmodium gallinaceum: clinical progression, recovery, and resistance to disease in chickens infected via mosquito bite
Author: Paulman, A.
McAllister, M.
Citation: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2005; 73(6):1104-1107
Publisher: Amer Soc Trop Med & Hygiene
Issue Date: 2005
ISSN: 0002-9637
1476-1645
Statement of
Responsibility: 
April Paulman and Milton M. Mcallister
Abstract: Historically, in vivo experiments of Plasmodium gallinaceum in chickens have caused high mortality. Perhaps because of this high mortality, it remains to be demonstrated whether recovered birds will resist a second episode of illness when re-exposed to infected mosquitoes. In the current study, groups of 10 chicks were infected with P. gallinaceum via mosquito bite. Parasitemia and anemia were followed by recovery in all birds, although they had persisting, low levels of parasitized erythrocytes (0.007 +/- 0.019%). Twenty-three days after the initial exposure, 10 recovered chicks were rechallenged with P. gallinaceum via mosquito bite; none of them developed clinical or hematological evidence of malaria, in contrast to matched control birds, which all became diseased (P < 0.001). Unlike previous studies, the current experiment had no mortality in chickens infected with P. gallinaceum by mosquito bite. Recovered birds resisted disease from re-exposure to the same organism. The duration and nature of immunity or premunition remain to be determined.
Keywords: Animals; Chickens; Culicidae; Plasmodium gallinaceum; Parasitemia; Malaria, Avian; Insect Bites and Stings; Insect Vectors; Female
Rights: Copyright © 2005 by The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
RMID: 0020101357
DOI: 10.4269/ajtmh.2005.73.1104
Appears in Collections:Agriculture, Food and Wine publications

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