Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/67179
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Type: Journal article
Title: Meat consumption and risk of primary hip and knee joint replacement due to osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study
Author: Wang, Yuanyuan
Simpson, Julie Anne
Wluka, Anita E.
English, Dallas R.
Giles, Graham G.
Graves, Stephen Ellis
Cicuttini, Flavia M.
Citation: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 2011; 12:17
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd.
Issue Date: 2011
ISSN: 1471-2474
School/Discipline: School of Medicine
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Responsibility: 
Yuanyuan Wang, Julie Anne Simpson, Anita E Wluka, Dallas R English, Graham G Giles, Stephen Graves, Flavia M Cicuttini
Abstract: Background: There is emerging evidence for a beneficial effect of meat consumption on the musculoskeletal system. However, whether it affects the risk of knee and hip osteoarthritis is unknown. We performed a prospective cohort study to examine the relationship between meat consumption and risk of primary hip and knee replacement for osteoarthritis. Methods: Eligible 35,331 participants were selected from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study recruited during 1990-1994. Consumption of fresh red meat, processed meat, chicken, and fish was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire. Primary hip and knee replacement for osteoarthritis during 2001-2005 was determined by linking the cohort records to the Australian National Joint Replacement Registry. Results: There was a negative dose-response relationship between fresh red meat consumption and the risk of hip replacement (hazard ratio (HR) 0.94 per increase in intake of one time/week, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-0.98). In contrast, there was no association with knee replacement risk (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.94-1.02). Consumption of processed meat, chicken and fish were not associated with risk of hip or knee replacement. Conclusion: A high level consumption of fresh red meat was associated with a decreased risk of hip, but not knee, joint replacement for osteoarthritis. One possible mechanism to explain these differential associations may be via an effect of meat intake on bone strength and hip shape. Further confirmatory studies are warranted.
Description: Extent: 10p.
Rights: © 2011 Wang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
RMID: 0020102754
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2474-12-17
Published version: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2474/12/17
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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