Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/67228
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Type: Journal article
Title: Bacterial succession in a glacier foreland of the high arctic
Author: Schutte, U.
Abdo, Z.
Bent, S.
Williams, C.
Schneider, G.
Solheim, B.
Forney, L.
Citation: The ISME Journal: multidisciplinary journal of microbial ecology, 2009; 3(11):1258-1268
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Issue Date: 2009
ISSN: 1751-7362
1751-7370
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Ursel M E Schütte, Zaid Abdo, Stephen J Bent, Christopher J Williams, G Maria Schneider, Bjørn Solheim and Larry J Forney
Abstract: Succession is defined as changes in biological communities over time. It has been extensively studied in plant communities, but little is known about bacterial succession, in particular in environments such as High Arctic glacier forelands. Bacteria carry out key processes in the development of soil, biogeochemical cycling and facilitating plant colonization. In this study we sampled two roughly parallel chronosequences in the foreland of Midre Love´n glacier on Svalbard, Norway and tested whether any of several factors were associated with changes in the structure of bacterial communities, including time after glacier retreat, horizontal variation caused by the distance between chronosequences and vertical variation at two soil depths. The structures of soil bacterial communities at different locations were compared using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms of 16S rRNA genes, and the data were analyzed by sequential analysis of loglinear statistical models. Although no significant differences in community structure were detected between the two chronosequences, statistically significant differences between sampling locations in the surface and mineral soils could be demonstrated even though glacier forelands are patchy and dynamic environments. These findings suggest that bacterial succession occurs in High Arctic glacier forelands but may differ in different soil depths.
Keywords: succession
High Arctic
glacier
bacteria
diversity
community
Rights: Copyright 2009 International Society for Microbial Ecology
DOI: 10.1038/ismej.2009.71
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest
Molecular and Biomedical Science publications

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