Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/68809
Type: Thesis
Title: Between Aufklarung and Sturm und Drang: Leopold and Wolfgang Mozart’s view of the World.
Author: Ford, Thomas McPharlin
Issue Date: 2011
School/Discipline: School of Humanities and Social Sciences
Abstract: This dissertation was conceived with the objective of considering the social, literary and philosophical forces of the eighteenth century through the eyes of Leopold and Wolfgang Mozart. The Enlightenment, and particularly in this dissertation the German Aufklärung, was an intellectual movement which attempted to amend many of society’s seeming imbalances, such as class structure and church authority. Leopold and Wolfgang Mozart experienced and acknowledged the same Aufklärung, but embraced and implemented their understanding in different and conflicting ways. Among the issues which the Mozarts considered in relation to the Aufklärung were: their respective attitudes towards and implementation of education; their mutual fascination with the life and work of Christoph Martin Wieland; their contrastive tolerance towards religious and racial minorities; their patriotism and consequent desire for German institutions; and their opposing attitude to their social standing in regards to the church and state. In looking at these issues, three main conclusions will be realised: Leopold’s preoccupation with education and his yearning to be considered amongst the Men of Letters of the Aufklärung; Leopold and Wolfgang’s incompatible attitude to social structure and the behaviour that was required of their respective standing; and, finally, the difficulties faced by the father–son relationship in the rapidly evolving eighteenth century.
Advisor: Coghlan, Brian
Carroll, Mark Stephen
King, Margaret Kathleen
Dissertation Note: Thesis (Ph.D.) -- University of Adelaide, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, 2011
Keywords: Mozart; Aufklarung; enlightenment; education; Joseph II; Wieland; Gellert; Men of Letters
Provenance: Copyright material removed from digital thesis. See print copy in University of Adelaide Library for full text.
Appears in Collections:Research Theses

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