Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/7180
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Type: Journal article
Title: Lack of association between duration of breast-feeding or introduction of cow's milk and development of islet autoimmunity
Author: Couper, J.
Steele, C.
Beresford, S.
Powell, T.
McCaul, K.
Pollard, A.
Gellert, S.
Tait, B.
Harrison, L.
Colman, P.
Citation: Diabetes, 1999; 48(11):2145-2149
Publisher: AMER DIABETES ASSOC
Issue Date: 1999
ISSN: 0012-1797
1939-327X
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Couper, Jennifer J.; Steele, Cheryl; Beresford, Sarah; Powell, Tania; Mccaul, Kieran; Pollard, Angie; Gellert, Shane; Tait, Brian; Harrison, Leonard C.; Colman, Peter G.
Abstract: The hypothesis that early exposure to cow's milk or lack of breast-feeding predisposes to type 1 diabetes remains controversial. We aimed to determine prospectively the relationship of, first, duration of exclusive breast-feeding and total duration of breast-feeding, and second, introduction of cow's milk protein as infant formula, cow's milk, or dairy products, to the development of islet antibodies in early life. Some 317 children with a first-degree relative with type 1 diabetes were followed prospectively from birth for 29 months (4-73). Mothers kept a home diary and answered infant feeding questionnaires at 6-month intervals. No systematic feeding advice was given. Insulin autoantibodies (normal range <5.5%), anti-GAD antibodies (<5.0 U), and anti-IA2 antibodies (<3.0 U) were measured at 6-month intervals. Cox proportional hazards model of survival analysis detected no significant difference between children who did not develop islet antibodies (225 of 317 [71%]), children with one islet antibody raised once (52 of 317 [16.4%]), children with one antibody raised repeatedly (18 of 317 [5.7%]), or children with two or more antibodies raised (22 of 317 [6.9%]), in terms of duration of exclusive breast-feeding, total duration of breast-feeding, or introduction of cow's milk-based infant formulas, cow's milk, or dairy products (relative risk: 0.91-1.09). Four of the children with two or more islet antibodies developed type 1 diabetes. We conclude that there is no prospective association between duration of breast-feeding or introduction of cow's milk and the development of islet autoimmunity in high-risk children.
Keywords: Islets of Langerhans
Milk
Fetal Blood
Animals
Cattle
Humans
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1
Glutamate Decarboxylase
Autoantibodies
HLA Antigens
Histocompatibility Testing
Longitudinal Studies
Breast Feeding
Aging
Time Factors
Infant Food
Infant, Newborn
Female
Male
DOI: 10.2337/diabetes.48.11.2145
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest
Paediatrics publications

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