Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/73404
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dc.contributor.authorClayton, P.en
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, S.en
dc.contributor.authorChapman, J.en
dc.contributor.authorChadban, S.en
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.citationTransplantation, 2012; 94(2):152-158en
dc.identifier.issn0041-1337en
dc.identifier.issn1534-6080en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/73404-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The use of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is associated with less acute rejection than azathioprine (AZA) early after kidney transplantation. However, the long-term impact of MMF versus AZA is less well studied. METHODS: The Tricontinental Mycophenolate Mofetil Renal Transplantation Study was a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial of MMF versus AZA, together with cyclosporine and steroids, first reported in 1996. We analyzed the long-term outcomes of the Australian cohort of patients enrolled in this study using follow-up data from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry. Patient and graft survival, cancer incidence, and estimated kidney function were compared on an intention-to-treat basis. RESULTS: A total of 133 Australian patients participated in the study: 45 were randomized to AZA, 44 were randomized to MMF 2 g/d, and 44 were randomized to MMF 3 g/d. Baseline characteristics were similar between the groups. Median follow-up was 13.8 years, during which there were 97 graft failures, 75 deaths, and 1 lost to follow-up. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in long-term patient or graft survival, cancer incidence, or kidney function. Death-censored graft survival was best in the group with 3 g/d MMF and worst in the group with 2 g/d MMF. By 5 years, 42% of the MMF group had switched permanently to AZA, whereas crossover from AZA to MMF was rare. CONCLUSIONS: This long-term examination, although limited by small numbers, found little evidence for the superiority of MMF over AZA.en
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityPhilip A. Clayton, Stephen P. McDonald, Jeremy Chapman and Steven J. Chadbanen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkinsen
dc.rights(C) 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.en
dc.subjectHumans; Mycophenolic Acid; Creatinine; Azathioprine; Immunosuppressive Agents; Glomerular Filtration Rate; Kidney Transplantation; Follow-Up Studies; Double-Blind Method; Adult; Middle Aged; Female; Maleen
dc.titleMycophenolate versus azathioprine for kidney transplantation: a 15-year follow-up of a randomized trialen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.identifier.rmid0020121036en
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/TP.0b013e31825475a3en
dc.identifier.pubid23661-
pubs.library.collectionPublic Health publicationsen
pubs.verification-statusVerifieden
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.identifier.orcidClayton, P. [0000-0001-9190-6753]en
dc.identifier.orcidMcDonald, S. [0000-0001-6103-1386]en
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