Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/74998
Type: Journal article
Title: Patients with colorectal cancer: a qualitative study of referral pathways and continuing care
Author: Harris, M.
Pascoe, S.
Crossland, L.
Beilby, J.
Veitch, C.
Spigelman, A.
Weller, D.
Citation: Australian Family Physician, 2012; 41(11):899-902
Publisher: Royal Australian College of General Practitioners
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 0300-8495
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Mark F. Harris, Shane Pascoe, Lisa Crossland, Justin Beilby, Craig Veitch, Allan Spigelman and David Weller
Abstract: BACKGROUND: This article explores the views of general practitioners on their referral of colorectal cancer patients following diagnosis to specialist surgeons. METHODS: Sampling was purposive. Nineteen GPs representing urban and rural areas participated in four focus groups. RESULTS: General practitioners viewed their relationship with surgeons to be of prime importance in the decision about whom to refer. This relationship allowed faster referrals and improved feedback from the specialist to the GP. General practitioners preferred referral to the private health services because they perceived delays in the public system and that referral and communication was easier with private specialists. Neither the volume of colorectal cancer work nor the availability of a multidisciplinary team influenced their decision making. DISCUSSION: The relationship and communication between GP and surgeon are important in facilitating the referral pathway and the continuing role that many GPs would like to have in the care of their patients.
Keywords: Colorectal cancer; referral and consultation; general practitioners; qualitative research
Rights: © The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners 2012
RMID: 0020123309
Published version: http://www.racgp.org.au/afp/2012/november/patients-with-colorectal-cancer/
Appears in Collections:Medical Sciences publications

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