Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/7510
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Type: Journal article
Title: Serum antibodies to Balamuthia mandrillaris, a free-living amoeba recently demonstrated to cause granulomatous amoebic encephalitis
Author: Huang, Z.
Ferrante, A.
Carter, R.
Citation: Journal of Infectious Diseases, 1999; 179(5):1305-1308
Publisher: UNIV CHICAGO PRESS
Issue Date: 1999
ISSN: 0022-1899
1537-6613
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Z. Hua Huang, Antonio Ferrante, and Rodney F. Carter
Abstract: Free-living amoebae cause three well-defined disease entities: a rapidly fatal primary meningoencephalitis, a chronic granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE), and a chronic amoebic keratitis. GAE occurs in immunocompromised persons. Recently, another type of free-living amoeba, Balamuthia mandrillaris, has been shown to cause GAE. The finding that this amoeba has caused infection in some healthy children has raised the possibility that humans may lack immunity to B. mandrillaris. Human serum was examined for the presence of surface antibodies specific for this amoeba by immunofluorescence. Sera from adults contained titers of 1/64–1/256 of anti–B. mandrillaris antibodies (IgM and IgG classes), which did not cross-react with other amoebae. Cord blood contained very low antibody levels, but levels similar to those in adults were seen in serum of 1- to 5-year-old children.
Keywords: Fetal Blood
Animals
Humans
Acanthamoeba
Amoeba
Naegleria fowleri
Encephalitis
Amebiasis
Granuloma
Immunoglobulin G
Immunoglobulin M
Antibodies, Protozoan
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Cross Reactions
Adult
Child, Preschool
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Description: © 1999 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.
DOI: 10.1086/314731
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest
Paediatrics publications

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