Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/76244
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Type: Journal article
Title: Monitoring progress in the management of hip fractures in South Australia, Australia
Author: Gordon, J.
Pham, C.
Karnon, J.
Crotty, M.
Citation: Archives of Osteoporosis, 2012; 7(1-2):267-273
Publisher: Springer UK
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 1862-3522
1862-3514
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Jason Gordon, Clarabelle T. Pham, Jonathan Karnon and Maria Crotty
Abstract: SUMMARY: The aim of this study was to assess trends in hip fracture rates and outcomes following hospitalisation for hip fracture. Hip fracture admissions increased over the study period. Men fared worst in terms of higher absolute mortality. Refracture rates and male health outcomes require further attention. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to assess trends in hip fracture rates and outcomes following hospitalisation for hip fracture in South Australia (SA). METHODS: Analysis of routinely collected, linked hospital separations data, of patients admitted to public and private hospitals in SA with a principal diagnosis of femoral neck fracture between July 2002 and June 2008 was done. Main outcome measures include number and rates of hospital admissions, 30-day in-hospital and 1-year mortality following a first hip fracture and subsequent event rates, by age and sex. RESULTS: Unadjusted hip fracture admissions increased in SA from 2002 to 2008 by 20 %, age-standardised (adjusted) admission rates increased overall (+5 %, p = 0.215) and significantly amongst males (+26 %, p = 0.001), while there was no change among women (−1 %, p = 0.763). Within 1 year of a hip fracture, 7 % had broken another bone (5 % had refractured a hip). At 1 year post-fracture, unadjusted mortality was consistently and considerably higher amongst men compared to women (33 versus 19 %, p < 0.001). Age-standardised mortality from admission to 1 year fell but not statistically significantly by 15 % in women (p = 0.131) and 8 % in men (p = 0.510). Women had a reduction in age-standardised in-hospital mortality over time (p = 0.048); there was a non-significant decline in men (p = 0.080). CONCLUSIONS: Hip fracture admissions in SA increased over the study period and this appears to be driven by an increase in admissions amongst men. Men fared worst in terms of higher absolute mortality. There is some evidence to suggest refracture rates and male health outcomes require further attention.
Keywords: Hip fracture; epidemiology; health outcomes
Rights: © International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation 2012
RMID: 0020125604
DOI: 10.1007/s11657-012-0107-y
Appears in Collections:Public Health publications

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