Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/77622
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Type: Journal article
Title: The circadian system in Alzheimer's disease: Disturbances, mechanisms, and opportunities
Author: Coogan, A.
Schutova, B.
Husung, S.
Furczyk, K.
Baune, B.
Kropp, P.
Haber, F.
Thome, J.
Citation: Biological Psychiatry, 2012; 333(339):1-7
Publisher: Elsevier Science Inc
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 0006-3223
1873-2402
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Andrew N. Coogan, Barbora Schutová, Susanne Husung, Karolina Furczyk, Bernhard T. Baune, Peter Kropp, Frank Häßler, and Johannes Thome
Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative condition associated with severe cognitive and behavioral impairments. Circadian rhythms are recurring cycles that display periods of approximately 24 hours and are driven by an endogenous circadian timekeeping system centered on the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. We review the compelling evidence that circadian rhythms are significantly disturbed in AD and that such disturbance is of significant clinical importance in terms of behavioral symptoms. We also detail findings from neuropathological studies of brain areas associated with the circadian system in postmortem studies, the use of animal models of AD in the investigation of circadian processes, and the evidence that chronotherapeutic approaches aimed at bolstering weakened circadian rhythms in AD produce beneficial outcomes. We argue that further investigation in such areas is warranted and highlight areas for future research that might prove fruitful in ultimately providing new treatment options for this most serious and intractable of conditions.
Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease
chronotherapy
circadian
dementia
SCN
sleep
Rights: © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry
DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2012.11.021
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 4
Psychiatry publications

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