Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/781
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: A modified version of the volume-averaged continuum theory to predict pressure drop across compressible packed beds of Sepharose Big-beads SP
Author: Colby, C.
O'Neill, B.
Middelberg, A.
Citation: Biotechnology Progress, 1996; 12(1):92-99
Publisher: AMER CHEMICAL SOC
Issue Date: 1996
ISSN: 8756-7938
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Christopher B. Colby, Brian K. O’Neill, and Anton P. J. Middelberg
Abstract: Using a modified version of the volume-averaged continuum theory for multiphase processes, theoretical predictions of pressure drop across compressible packed beds of Sepharose Big-Beads SP (Amrad Pharmacia Biotech, Sydney, Australia) are made. Modifications to the volume-averaged continuum theory included an additional term incorporated into governing equations to account for the influence of column diameter and a constitutive function to account for the effect of compressibility on pressure gradient. Theoretical predictions are compared to experimental pressure-drop data. Results indicate the modified volume-averaged continuum theory can provide accurate pressure-drop predictions for Sepharose Big-Beads SP at different bed heights, column diameters, superficial velocities, and fluid viscosity. The influence of column diameter on pressure-drop behavior during scale-up is then examined by comparing theoretical predictions for laboratory and production-scale columns. Predictions demonstrate a significant dependence on column diameter. This result emphasizes the dangers of predicting pressure-drop behavior for compressible chromatography resins in production-scale columns by extrapolation from laboratory-scale pressure-drop data.
Rights: Copyright © 1996 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE)
DOI: 10.1021/bp950029k
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 2
Chemical Engineering publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.