Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/78411
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Type: Journal article
Title: A maternal 'junk-food' diet reduces sensitivity to the opioid antagonist naloxone in offspring postweaning
Author: Gugusheff, J.
Ong, Z.
Muhlhausler, B.
Citation: The FASEB Journal, 2013; 27(3):1275-1284
Publisher: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Issue Date: 2013
ISSN: 1530-6860
1530-6860
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Jessica R. Gugusheff, Zhi Yi Ong and Beverly S. Muhlhausler
Abstract: Perinatal exposure to a maternal “junk-food” diet has been demonstrated to increase the preference for palatable diets in adult offspring. We aimed to determine whether this increased preference could be attributed to changes in μ-opioid receptor expression within the mesolimbic reward pathway. We report here that mRNA expression of the μ-opioid receptor in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) at weaning was 1.4-fold (males) and 1.9-fold (females) lower in offspring of junk-food (JF)-fed rat dams than in offspring of dams fed a standard rodent diet (control) (P<0.05). Administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone to offspring given a palatable diet postweaning significantly reduced fat intake in control offspring (males: 7.7±0.7 vs. 5.4±0.6 g/kg/d; females: 6.9±0.3 vs. 3.9±0.5g/kg/d; P<0.05), but not in male JF offspring (8.6±0.6 vs. 7.1±0.5g/kg/d) and was less effective at reducing fat intake in JF females (42.2±6.0 vs. 23.1±4.1% reduction, P<0.05). Similar findings were observed for total energy intake. Naloxone treatment did not affect intake of standard rodent feed in control or JF offspring. These findings suggest that exposure to a maternal junk-food diet results in early desensitization of the opioid system which may explain the increased preference for junk food in these offspring.—Gugusheff, J. R., Ong, Z. Y., Muhlhausler, B. S. A maternal “junk-food” diet reduces sensitivity to the opioid antagonist naloxone in offspring postweaning.
Keywords: fetal programming; high-fat diet; reward
Rights: © FASEB
RMID: 0020125839
DOI: 10.1096/fj.12-217653
Appears in Collections:Agriculture, Food and Wine publications

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