Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/7891
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Type: Journal article
Title: Autoaugmentation gastrocystoplasty and demucosalized gastrocystoplasty in a sheep model
Author: Dewan, P.
Stefanek, W.
Lorenz, C.
Owen, A.
Byard, R.
Citation: Urology, 1995; 45(2):291-295
Publisher: Elsevier Science
Issue Date: 1995
ISSN: 0090-4295
1527-9995
Statement of
Responsibility: 
P.A. Dewan, W. Stefanek, C. Lorenz, A.J. Owen, R.W. Byard
Abstract: <h4>Objectives</h4>To compare the normal sheep bladder at 6 and 12 months with bladders subjected to either an autoaugmentation gastrocystoplasty or a clam demucosalized gastrocystoplasty.<h4>Methods</h4>Twenty male lambs aged between 8 and 10 weeks had an autoaugmentation gastrocystoplasty in which de-epithelialized stomach muscle was added to an intact urothelium. The functional, radiologic, and histologic outcomes were compared with 11 animals who underwent a clam demucosalized gastrocystoplasty and 14 control animals. A total of 18 operated animals had a urodynamic study at 6 months and 9 at 12 months.<h4>Results</h4>The average bladder volume for the autoaugmentation gastrocystoplasty group at 12 months was greater than that of the control group (401 +/- 120 mL versus 205 +/- 77 mL). The demucosalized clam bladders had been less effectively enlarged (286 +/- 77 mL). The compliance values for autoaugmentation gastrocystoplasty animals were 14.7 +/- 11.3 mL/cm water (H2O) compared with 9.0 +/- 4.8 mL/cm H2O in the demucosalized gastrocystoplasty group, and 9.1 +/- 3.7 mL/cm H2O for the control animals.<h4>Conclusions</h4>The addition of the autoaugmentation procedure improves the prospect of enlarging the normal sheep bladder when using demucosalized gastric muscle.
Keywords: Stomach; Gastric Mucosa; Animals; Sheep; Radiography; Male; Urinary Bladder
RMID: 0030005359
DOI: 10.1016/0090-4295(95)80020-4
Appears in Collections:Paediatrics publications

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