Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/80960
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Type: Conference paper
Title: Performance study of differential evolution with various mutation strategies applied to water distribution system optimization
Author: Zheng, F.
Simpson, A.
Zecchin, A.
Citation: World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2011: Bearing Knowledge for Sustainability, Palm Springs, California, United States, 22 May -26 May 2011 / R. Edward Beighley II and Mark W. Killgore (eds.): pp. 166-176
Publisher: American Society of Civil Engineers
Publisher Place: USA
Issue Date: 2011
ISBN: 9780784411735
Conference Name: World Environmental and Water Resources Congress (2011 : Palm Springs, California, USA)
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Feifei Zheng, Angus R. Simpson and Aaron Zecchin
Abstract: Differential evolution (DE) is a relatively new optimization technique that has been employed to optimize the design of water distribution systems (WDSs). There are three important operators involved in the use of DE: mutation, crossover and selection. These operators are similar to the commonly used genetic algorithms (GAs). However, DE differs significantly from GAs in that mutation is an important operator for DE, while in contrast, crossover is an important operator for GAs. It has been found that the success of the DE algorithm in solving different mathematical optimization problems crucially depends on the mutation strategy that is used. This paper aims to investigate the relative effectiveness of five frequently used mutation strategies of DE when applied to WDS optimization. The five DE variants with different mutation strategies are applied to two well-known WDS case studies: the New York Tunnels Problem and the Hanoi Problem.
Rights: © 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers
DOI: 10.1061/41173(414)18
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest 7
Civil and Environmental Engineering publications

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