Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/81234
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dc.contributor.authorSomasundaram, D.-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationPsychiatric Clinics of North America, 2013; 36(3):321-338-
dc.identifier.issn0193-953X-
dc.identifier.issn1558-3147-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/81234-
dc.description.abstractSri Lanka has faced several disasters in the recent past, both manmade and natural. The mental health and psychosocial consequences have been felt at the individual, family, and collective levels. Individuals developed normal distress, posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, or alcohol abuse. There were changes in family and social processes causing a tearing of the social fabric, lack of social cohesion, disconnection, mistrust, hopelessness, dependency, lack of motivation, powerlessness, and despondency. Because of the widespread nature of mental health needs, a community approach would reach the most number of people.-
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityDaya Somasundaram-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherW B Saunders Co-
dc.rightsCopyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.-
dc.subjectCollective trauma-
dc.subjectCommunity approaches-
dc.subjectDisaster-
dc.subjectTsunami-
dc.subjectWar-
dc.titleRecent disasters in Sri Lanka: Lessons learned-
dc.typeJournal article-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psc.2013.05.001-
pubs.publication-statusPublished-
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest
Psychiatry publications

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