Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/82283
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Type: Journal article
Title: Prevalence of genetic renal disease in children
Author: Fletcher, J.
McDonald, S.
Alexander, S.
Citation: Pediatric Nephrology, 2013; 28(2):251-256
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Issue Date: 2013
ISSN: 0931-041X
1432-198X
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Jeffery Fletcher, Stephen McDonald, Stephen I. Alexander
Abstract: BACKGROUND Genetic etiology comprises a significant proportion of renal disease in childhood. Completion of the Human Genome Project and increased genetic testing has assisted with the increased recognition of a genetic basis to many renal disorders. Australia and New Zealand have a relatively stable but diverse population, with eight major pediatric nephrology referral centers, which allow ascertainment of disease frequency. METHODS To determine prevalence, pediatric nephrologists at the eight centers in Australia and New Zealand were surveyed on their estimated number of patients with renal disease of genetic etiology over a 10-year period. Disease prevalence was calculated using combined national population data. RESULTS The overall prevalence of genetic kidney disease in children in Australia and New Zealand is 70.6 children per million age-representative population. Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) are the most frequent, with a prevalence of 16.3 and 10.7, respectively, per million children. CONCLUSION We find a similar prevalence of genetic renal disorders in Australia and New Zealand to those reported in other countries. This is likely to be due to inclusion of children with all forms of renal disease rather than being limited to those with renal impairment.
Keywords: Genetic kidney disease; Pediatrics; Prevalence; ESRD; CAKUT; Genetics
Rights: © IPNA 2012
RMID: 0020135469
DOI: 10.1007/s00467-012-2306-6
Appears in Collections:Public Health publications

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