Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/82665
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dc.contributor.authorPhungamla Vashum, K.-
dc.contributor.authorMcEvoy, M.-
dc.contributor.authorShi, Z.-
dc.contributor.authorMilton, A.-
dc.contributor.authorIslam, M.-
dc.contributor.authorSibbritt, D.-
dc.contributor.authorPatterson, A.-
dc.contributor.authorByles, J.-
dc.contributor.authorLoxton, D.-
dc.contributor.authorAttia, J.-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Endocrine Disorders, 2013; 13(1):1-8-
dc.identifier.issn1472-6823-
dc.identifier.issn1472-6823-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2440/82665-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND Animal studies have shown that zinc intake has protective effects against type 2 diabetes, but few studies have been conducted to examine this relationship in humans. The aim of this study is to investigate if dietary zinc is associated with risk of type 2 diabetes in a longitudinal study of mid-age Australian women. METHODS Data were collected from a cohort of women aged 45-50 years at baseline, participating in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to assess dietary intake and other nutrients. Predictors of 6-year incidence of type 2 diabetes were examined using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS From 8921 participants, 333 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were identified over 6 years of follow-up. After adjustment for dietary and non-dietary factors, the highest quintile dietary zinc intake had almost half the odds of developing type 2 diabetes (OR = 0.50, 95% C.I. 0.32–0.77) compared with the lowest quintile. Similar findings were observed for the zinc/iron ratio; the highest quintile had half the odds of developing type 2 diabetes (OR = 0.50, 95% C.I 0.30-0.83) after multivariable adjustment of covariates. CONCLUSIONS Higher total dietary zinc intake and high zinc/iron ratio are associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes in women. This finding is a positive step towards further research to determine if zinc supplementation may reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.-
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityKhanrin Phungamla Vashum, Mark McEvoy, Zumin Shi, Abul Hasnat Milton, Md Rafiqul Islam, David Sibbritt, Amanda Patterson, Julie Byles, Deborah Loxton and John Attia-
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd-
dc.rights© 2013 Vashum et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.-
dc.subjectDiabetes-
dc.subjectAustralia-
dc.subjectWomen & Zinc-
dc.titleIs dietary zinc protective for type 2 diabetes? Results from the Australian longitudinal study on women's health-
dc.typeJournal article-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6823-13-40-
pubs.publication-statusPublished-
dc.identifier.orcidShi, Z. [0000-0002-3099-3299]-
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