Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/82754
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Type: Journal article
Title: The protein kinase Pstol1 from traditional rice confers tolerance of phosphorus deficiency
Author: Gamuyao, R.
Chin, J.
Pariasca-Tanaka, J.
Pesaresi, P.
Catausan, S.
Dalid, C.
Slamet-Loedin, I.
Tecson-Mendoza, E.
Wissuwa, M.
Heuer, S.
Citation: Nature, 2012; 488(7412):535-539
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Issue Date: 2012
ISSN: 0028-0836
1476-4687
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Rico Gamuyao, Joong Hyoun Chin, Juan Pariasca-Tanaka, Paolo Pesaresi, Sheryl Catausan, Cheryl Dalid, Inez Slamet-Loedin, Evelyn Mae Tecson-Mendoza, Matthias Wissuwa & Sigrid Heuer
Abstract: As an essential macroelement for all living cells, phosphorus is indispensable in agricultural production systems. Natural phosphorus reserves are limited1, and it is therefore important to develop phosphorus-efficient crops. A major quantitative trait locus for phosphorus-deficiency tolerance, Pup1, was identified in the traditional aus-type rice variety Kasalath about a decade ago2, 3. However, its functional mechanism remained elusive4, 5 until the locus was sequenced, showing the presence of a Pup1-specific protein kinase gene6, which we have named phosphorus-starvation tolerance 1 (PSTOL1). This gene is absent from the rice reference genome and other phosphorus-starvation-intolerant modern varieties7, 8. Here we show that overexpression of PSTOL1 in such varieties significantly enhances grain yield in phosphorus-deficient soil. Further analyses show that PSTOL1 acts as an enhancer of early root growth, thereby enabling plants to acquire more phosphorus and other nutrients. The absence of PSTOL1 and other genes—for example, the submergence-tolerance gene SUB1A—from modern rice varieties underlines the importance of conserving and exploring traditional germplasm. Introgression of this quantitative trait locus into locally adapted rice varieties in Asia and Africa is expected to considerably enhance productivity under low phosphorus conditions.
Keywords: Plants, Genetically Modified; Oryza sativa; Plant Roots; Phosphorus; Protein Kinases; Plant Proteins; Breeding; Adaptation, Physiological; Genes, Plant; Genome, Plant; Quantitative Trait Loci; Molecular Sequence Data; Droughts
Description: Published online: 22 August 2012
Rights: © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.
RMID: 0020134083
DOI: 10.1038/nature11346
Appears in Collections:Agriculture, Food and Wine publications

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