Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/83467
Citations
Scopus Web of Science® Altmetric
?
?
Type: Journal article
Title: Arbuscular mycorrhizas are beneficial under both deficient and toxic soil zinc conditions
Author: Watts-Williams, S.
Patti, A.
Cavagnaro, T.
Citation: Plant and Soil, 2013; 371(1-2):299-312
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publ
Issue Date: 2013
ISSN: 0032-079X
1573-5036
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Stephanie J. Watts-Williams & Antonio F. Patti & Timothy R. Cavagnaro
Abstract: BACKGROUND AND AIMS Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) play different roles in plant Zn nutrition depending on whether the soil is Zn-deficient (AM enhancement of plant Zn uptake) or Zn-toxic (AM protection of plant from excessive Zn uptake). In addition, soil P concentration modifies the response of AM to soil Zn conditions. We undertook a glasshouse experiment to study the interactive effects of P and Zn on AM colonisation, plant growth and nutrition, focusing on the two extremes of soil Zn concentration—deficient and toxic. METHODS We used a mycorrhiza-defective tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) genotype (rmc) and compared it to its wild-type counterpart (76R). Plants were grown in pots amended with five soil P addition treatments, and two soil Zn addition treatments. RESULTS The mycorrhizal genotype generally thrived better than the non-mycorrhizal genotype, in terms of biomass and tissue P and Zn concentrations. This was especially true under low soil Zn and P conditions, however there was evidence of the ‘protective effect’ of mycorrhizas when soil was Zn-contaminated. Above- and below-ground allocation of biomass, P and Zn were significantly affected by AM colonisation, and toxic soil Zn conditions. CONCLUSIONS The relationship between soil Zn and soil P was highly interactive, and heavily influenced AM colonisation, plant growth, and plant nutrition.
Keywords: Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM); Zinc; Phosphorus; Mycorrhiza defective tomato mutant (rmc); Solanum lycopersicum (Tomato)
Rights: © Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013
RMID: 0020138153
DOI: 10.1007/s11104-013-1670-8
Appears in Collections:Earth and Environmental Sciences publications

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.